Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Don John In Souliloquy.


Don John In Souliloquy from In Souliloquy on Vimeo.

A villain of little words, speaks.
Performed by Jonathan Cobb
Written by Tilly Lunken
Directed by Victorine Pontillon
After William Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing.
In Souliloquy is devised and produced by V&T
Don John In Souliloquy is part of Cycle 4 of this project
Music:
Sneaky Snitch by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) 
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

So Don John is a character I wanted to write but kept putting it off because he just didn't fit into my headspace. But with our fourth cycle I was determined to write him - he doesn't speak much in the play, declaring himself a man of little words but you can just tell he is dying to let fly and deluge of reasons for why he is the way he is.
Write me a sexy villain - Victorine's instructions - and there we are. Here he is! Absolutely dripping with the bad boy charisma. There's something mesmerising in the tight shot, unequivocal gaze and Jon's great performance that totally makes you feel 'Yeah sure, this guy really knows what he's talking about. Let's smash through the illusion. Boom!'    
This was very satisfying to write, partly because the character has so few lines in Much Ado despite being the main plot driver. Giving him the platform to sound off was a lot of fun. 
Don John is the last of our 2016 Cycles - and it's a lovely bookend with Juliet - both heartbroken in different ways. 

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Marina In Souliloquy.


Marina In Souliloquy from In Souliloquy on Vimeo.

True strength comes from knowing yourself.
Performed by Lydia Lane
Written by Tilly Lunken
Directed by Victorine Pontillon
After William Shakespeare’s Pericles, Prince of Tyre.
Special thanks to Jennifer Hook.
In Souliloquy is devised and produced by V&T
Marina in Souliloquy is part of Cycle 4 of this project.
Music:
Avec Soin by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0
creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/


Marina surprised us both. She was a character from a completely bonkers play neither of us were familiar with, but once we started work - she just shone. Everything that Shakespeare's Soap-addled plot throws in her path she deals with, with strength of character, conviction and a self-determination of her own destiny. Of course the play is named after her father and isn't really about her at all - but she is steadfast, sure and absolutely the person we should all aspire to emulate.

What is also wonderful is how much of a feminist she is. How she survives everything using her skills and even through her grief she finds life and love.

Lydia's performance is also lovely, it's brimming with warmth and glows with inner strength. This one makes me cry, but it also makes me want to seize control of who I am and what I make and hug the world.

For we are all more than any simple destiny. xxx